The Martin and Osa Johnson Safari Museum currently has three traveling exhibitions available.
For more information on these or other exhibition loan opportunities, please contact  Safari Museum curator Jacquelyn Borgeson, our museum curator, at 620-431-2730.

MARRIED TO ADVENTURE

IMA 2

He was brave, daring, sincere, and epitomized the American values of hard work and resourcefulness. He was a master filmmaker who pioneered wildlife cinematography in some of the most untamed regions of the world. He was also a showman who knew how to fill theaters with audiences eager to see films of his latest adventures.

She was beautiful, photogenic, charming, a crack shot, and enjoyed high adventure. She had no equal when it came to tracking wildlife and to organizing the logistics of complex safaris. Yet, she was no tomboy. Her elegant wardrobe and great stage presence earned her the title of one of the best-dressed women in America. Men and women on three continents admired her.

Together, Martin and Osa Johnson were acclaimed filmmakers, photographers and explorers. They were American heroes, who in the style of Richard Byrd and Charles Lindbergh, brought the adventure and fascination of Africa and the South Pacific into the homes of millions of Americans.

Married to Adventure features 70 framed photographs, 20 related artifacts and Movie Posters, 2 large panoramic photo displays and 11 wall text panels.  The exhibition can be customized to accommodate hosts with both small and large venues.

To learn how you can bring this exhibition to a site in your community, please contact Safari Museum curator Jacquelyn Borgeson, our museum curator, at 620-431-2730.

The 70 photographs featured in this exhibition can be viewed in our online galleries:
Click Here to Tour Married to Adventure

MASTERS IN THE FIELD

wolf_burchellszebra

Nature, in all its color and life, has fascinated people throughout history. At no time was this enchantment expressed more beautifully in art than during the 18th and 19th centuries, an era of extensive curiosity about natural history. As explorers swept across the globe, they sparked an international interest in the natural world and provided vast amounts of information to be studied, compiled and recorded in word and picture.

Artists featured in this exhibition include Johns James Audubon, Gorges Cuvier, John Gould, Henrick Gronvold, Frederick Frohawk, John Gerard Keulesmans, Edwin Landseer, Edward Lear, F.P. Nodder, Jean Gabriel Pretre, Robert Ridgeway, Alexander Wilson and Josef Wolf.

Masters in the Field features 48 framed lithographs.  The exhibition can be customized to accommodate hosts with both small and large venues, and both loose, unframed, hand-colored lithographs as well as corresponding plate books could be loaned in conjunction for hosts who would prefer to include 3D artifacts with the lithographs.

To learn how you can bring this exhibition to a site in your community, please contact Safari Museum curator Jacquelyn Borgeson, our museum curator, at 620-431-2730.

The framed lithographs in this exhibition can be viewed in our online galleries:  Click Here to Tour Masters in the Field

CHANGING FACES

mende masks changing faces title plate

Africans wear their art as much as they hang it on the wall.

Taken out of context, however,  masks in particular lose much of their original significance and power.

The masked expression, including headdress, dancer, costume, and ritual accessories accompanied by their traditional musical instruments communicate the relationship between the African people, their physical world and the spiritual realm.

Changing Faces: The Art of African Masks is a traveling exhibition from the Martin and Osa Johnson Safari Museum in Chanute, Kansas.  It showcases masks from the African continent to illustrate and open a discourse about the complete artistry and significance of the masked expression and its traditional role in African culture.

 These masks are from the Safari Museum’s core West African collections and are hand selected for each individual host venue. A few of the masks that are available to travel in this exhibition are shown below. We currently have 40 Mende Masks, 70 more performance pieces and statuary, and over 30 musical instruments available for this special exhibition.  Our curatorial staff will be happy to discuss options with each host site.

 Today throughout Africa masked dances are still performed and they are sacred bridges between humankind and the divine. Drained of their spiritual connection and placed completely out of context in museums and art galleries, masks unfortunately lose much of their original significance and power.  It is the hope that when visitors tour this exhibition, they enjoy these “empty masks,” hear their music and try to imagine how spectacular they were long ago when they still danced under the hot sun or full moon of their African homeland.

To learn how you can bring this exhibition to a site in your community, please contact Safari Museum curator Jacquelyn Borgeson, our museum curator, at 620-431-2730.

Changing Faces features Mende Masks, but we can accommodate a variety of West African artifact requests for addition to this exhibition. A small selection of the masks and other art available for this exhibition are highlighted below.