“Safari Travelogue Speaker Series 2014″

Safari Travelogue November 20th: The Isle of Guernsey
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Join us Thursday, Nov. 20th for a Safari Travelogue Speakers Series event presented by Dr. David Guernsey about his time spent on the Isle of Guernsey while studying abroad.

Doors open in the Safari Museum at 6:45 with the program scheduled to start at 7. Light refreshments will be provided and the event is free to the public.  Please call (620) 431-2730 for directions, questions or more information on any Safari Museum-related program.

Safari Travelogue December 18th: KenyaPamela Peters

Pamela Peters will be on hand to discuss her trip to many of the same East African locales Martin & Osa Johnson explored in the 1920s & 30s. Highlights of the talk will involve a discussion and photos from three national parks, Amboseli, Samburu, and Masai Mara, as well as Mt Kilimanjaro at sunset.Eyes Into the Soul5x7Entwined5x7Morning Strollno tin5x7

Doors open in the Safari Museum at 6:45 with the program scheduled to start at 7. Light refreshments will be provided and the event is free to the public.  Please call (620) 431-2730 for directions, questions or more information on this or any Safari Museum-related program.

 

 

 

The Latest in Johnsonian Biographies

Across the World with the Johnsons: Visual Culture and American Empire in the Twentieth Century
Prue Ahrens, Lamont Lindstrom and Fiona Paisley
Ashgate, November 2013.

Brockey

During the interwar period Osa and Martin Johnson became famous for their films that brought exotic and far-off locations to the American cinema. Before the advent of mass tourism and television, their films played a major part in providing the means by which large audiences in the US and beyond became familiar with distant and ‘wild’ places across the world. Taking the celebrity of the Johnsons as its case study, this book investigates the influence of these new forms of visual culture, showing how they created their own version of America’s imperial drama. By representing themselves as benevolent figures engaged in preserving on film the world’s last wild places and peoples, the Johnsons’ films educated U.S. audiences about their apparent destiny to rule, contributing significantly to the popularity of empire.

Bringing together research in the fields of film and politics – including gender and empire, historical anthropology, photography and visual studies – this book provides a comprehensive evaluation of the Johnsons, their work and its impact. It considers the Johnsons as a celebrity duo, their status as national icons, how they promoted themselves and their expeditions, and how their careers informed American expansionism, thus providing the first scholarly investigation of this remarkable couple and their extensive output over nearly three decades and across several continents.